Review: Les Miserables

Written for Time Out

If the second longest running show in the West End was looking a little tired, a rejuvenating orchestral facelift was just what the doctor ordered. Cameron Mackintosh’s ‘little girl’ has shaken off that 1980s synth vibe and finally woken up to the organic noughties. This is a new, richer sound with strong operatic undertones and even the faint echoes of chamber music.

Led by compelling ex-‘Phantom…’ Ramin Karimloo as Jean Valjean, this dynamic cast blows a whirlwind through the Queen’s Theatre, hurtling along Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s famous melodrama. Aided by a swirling revolve and John Napier’s stunning constructivist set, we follow Jean Valjean’s journey across France as he attempts to escape his criminal past and make amends.

Hadley Fraser as Javert, Valjean’s fated pursuer, matches Karimloo’s booming vocals and moody stares step for step (at one point rather sweetly causing a premature ovation). Craig Mather and Lisa-Anne Wood do very prettily as lovelorn young leads Marius and Cosette. But it is Alexia Khadime’s soaring ‘On My Own’ that storms the barricades; her plucky and faithful Eponine genuinely pulls at the heartstrings.

For all its legions of fans, there are many who would sniff at this revived ‘Les Miserables’, branding it ‘opera lite’. In a sense they would be right: all this histrionic bombast is only really making soap opera respectable. But so what. This updated and improved production is a real rabble-rouser and while it may be tosh, it’s still stirring, beautifully made Cameron Mackintosh.

Mon-Sat 7.30pm, Wed, Sat Mats 2.30pm